Last edited by Arashikora
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

6 edition of Saint Jerome in the Renaissance (The Johns Hopkins Symposia in Comparative History) found in the catalog.

Saint Jerome in the Renaissance (The Johns Hopkins Symposia in Comparative History)

by Eugene F. Rice

  • 347 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by The Johns Hopkins University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History of religion,
  • Roman Catholicism, Roman Catholic Church,
  • Jerome,,
  • Church History,
  • History - General History,
  • History: American,
  • d. 419 or 20,
  • Renaissance,
  • Christianity - History - Catholic,
  • Europe - General,
  • History / Europe / General,
  • Influence,
  • Saint,

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages304
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7869822M
    ISBN 100801837472
    ISBN 109780801837470

      Saint Jerome died at Bethlehem from a long illness on Septem He is buried at St. Mary Major in Rome. 2) We celebrate International Translation Day on the date of Saint Jerome’s death. Even though saints are a Catholic practice, people from all over the world celebrate International Translation Day on the day Saint Jerome died. The altar of St Jerome closes the right-side aisle, as it is set at the back of the pier of St Longinus. Since 2nd June it had been dedicated to the Blessed John XXIII. Over it is the altarpiece with the Last Communion of St Jerome, a mosaic copy realized in after the famous painting by Domenichino, nowadays kept in the Pinacoteca.

      Her favourite Carpaccio hangs in the Scuola di San Giorgio degli Schiavoni, a guild house near St Mark’s Square. For centuries the painting (pictured) was thought to show St Jerome. The Principal Works of St. Jerome book. Read 3 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Saint Jerome (c. – 30 September ) (formerly /5(3).

    St. Jerome in his Study Joos Van Cleve, Netherlandish, 16th Century The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College Poughkeepsie, New York Purchase, Friends of the Vassar College Art Gallery Fund Painted in his signature style of dispassionate realism, Van Cleve's Jerome is seated in his study, surrounded by items that symbolize his. Just as they aspired to revive the Greek and Roman past, so the humanist scholars of the Renaissance sought to retrieve the early Christian era. Among the most fully studied figures of Christian antiquity was Saint Jerome. Eugene Rice's award-winning book traces the saint's changing images and fo.


Share this book
You might also like
New horizons in ecumenism

New horizons in ecumenism

Skein-winding reels

Skein-winding reels

ICAN

ICAN

Tool-room practice.

Tool-room practice.

wooden horse

wooden horse

Angling theories and methods

Angling theories and methods

The Shape of the Labor regime

The Shape of the Labor regime

Aids to ethics and professional conduct for student radiologic technologists.

Aids to ethics and professional conduct for student radiologic technologists.

Globalization and the production of new urban spaces

Globalization and the production of new urban spaces

role of the opposition in Parliament

role of the opposition in Parliament

Battered women syndrome

Battered women syndrome

Truth and corrigibility

Truth and corrigibility

Voices of strength and hope for a friend with AIDS

Voices of strength and hope for a friend with AIDS

Farm organization and income in relation to soil conservation, Coshocton, Ohio

Farm organization and income in relation to soil conservation, Coshocton, Ohio

Fan noise measurement procedures

Fan noise measurement procedures

case of knives

case of knives

Saint Jerome in the Renaissance (The Johns Hopkins Symposia in Comparative History) by Eugene F. Rice Download PDF EPUB FB2

Among the most fully studied figures of Christian antiquity was Saint Jerome. Eugene Rice's award-winning book traces the saint's changing images and fortunes from to and charts how culture-- popular and elite, secular and sacred, pietistic and scholarly-- celebrated those aspects of Jerome's life that best suited its own by: Saint Jerome in the Renaissance.

[Eugene F Rice] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Jerome, Saint; Jérôme, saint; Jerome, Saint; Jerome, Saint: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Saint Jerome in the Renaissance book Eugene F Rice.

Find more information about: ISBN: Saint Jerome in the Renaissance. [Eugene F Rice] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Jerome, Saint; Jerome, Saint: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Eugene F Rice.

Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number:   Saint Jerome in the Renaissance by Eugene F. Rice,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(5).

Saint Jerome in the Renaissance. Eugene F. Rice. Sign up for more information on JHUP Books. Subscribe Now. Also Recommended.

European Landed Elites in the Nineteenth Century. Lorenzo de' Medici and the Art of Magnificence. Women in Public. Western Attitudes toward Death. The French Book. Jerome died in or C.E. In the later Middle Ages and Renaissance, Jerome would become a popular subject for artists, often depicted, incorrectly and anachronistically, in the robes of a cardinal.

Saint Jerome is the patron saint of librarians and translators. The first monograph in English on Erasmus of Rotterdam as an editor of St. Jerome, this book belongs to the growing scholarship on the reception of the Church Fathers in early modern Europe.

Erasmus, like other Renaissance humanists, particularly admired Jerome (d. or ), and he expressed his admiration most conspicuously in his edition.

Jerome, Latin in full Eusebius Hieronymus, pseudonym Sophronius, (born c.Stridon, Dalmatia—died /, Bethlehem, Palestine; feast day September 30), biblical translator and monastic leader, traditionally regarded as the most learned of the Latin Fathers.

He lived for a time as a hermit, became a priest, served as secretary to Pope Damasus I, and about established a monastery. Between andSt. Jerome gave all his attention to the translation of the Old Testament according to the Hebrew, but this work alternated with many others.

Between he translated the Books of Samuel and of Kings, Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Canticle of Canticles, Esdras.

Among the most fully studied figures of Christian antiquity was Saint Jerome. Eugene Rice's award-winning book traces the saint's changing images and fortunes from to and charts how culture-- popular and elite, secular and sacred, pietistic and scholarly-- celebrated those aspects of Jerome's life that best suited its own purposes.

written at roughly the same time that Jerome was at work on his translation. One example is a poem in Aramaic called, “The Lord Lowered the Sky to Sinai,” which has found its way into a number of Eastern European Jewish prayer books from the 16th and 17th centuries. The poem is about the meeting between God and Moses atop Sinai and is.

Saint Jerome in the Renaissance (The Johns Hopkins Symposia in Comparative History) [Rice, Professor Eugene F.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Saint Jerome in the Renaissance (The Johns Hopkins Symposia in Comparative History)Cited by: Buy Saint Jerome in the Renaissance: 13 (The Johns Hopkins Symposia in Comparative History) Illustrated by Rice, Prof Eugene F.

(ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 1. Vulgate, (from the Latin editio vulgata: “common version”), Latin Bible used by the Roman Catholic Church, primarily translated by St. Jerome. In Pope Damasus commissioned Jerome, the leading biblical scholar of his day, to produce an acceptable Latin version of the Bible from the various.

He was an avid student, a thorough scholar, a prodigious letter-writer and a consultant to monk, bishop, and pope. Saint Augustine said of him, “What Jerome is ignorant of, no mortal has ever known.” Saint Jerome is particularly important for having made a translation of.

Medieval and Renaissance images of St. Jerome derive their iconography from the Golden Legend or its sources. JEROME'S VISIONS The first episode in the Legend's life of St. Jerome recounts a vision of his in which he was scourged in Heaven for retaining his books of classical literature.

Home > Saint Jerome in the Renaissance > Reviews "An important and beautiful book." — Charles Trinkaus, University of Michigan "An invaluable reference guide for scholars in all fields who seek a contextual analysis of Renaissance references to the Saint." — Journal of Religion.

The Renaissance iconography of St. Jerome derived from the wildly popular Golden Legend book, which was written by Jacobus de Voragine, around The Golden Legend told the stories of the saints to whom people prayed.

It was the medieval version of a soap opera. There are more than manuscripts which have survived. Herculean Labours: Erasmus and the Editing of St. Jerome's Letters in the Renaissance Hilmar M.

Pabel The first monograph in English on Erasmus of Rotterdam as an editor of St. Jerome, this book belongs to the growing scholarship on the reception of the Church Fathers in early modern Europe.

Objects on the desk and the shelves include an hourglass, a pounce pot, a ruler, an astrolabe, numerous books and writing instruments, all suitable for the idealized Renaissance man.

See also. Saint Jerome in His Study (Ghirlandaio) Sources. Zuffi, Stefano (). Il Quattrocento. Milan: Electa. Rhetoric in the Middle Ages: A History of Rhetorical Theory from Saint Augustine to the Renaissance Volume of Campus (Berkeley) Author: James Jerome Murphy: Publisher: University of California Press, ISBN:Length: pages: .Saint Jerome in His Study is an oil painting on panel attributed to the workshop of the early Netherlandish painter Jan van Eyck, dated to (the year after the master's death) and now in the Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit.

Since the date on the painting is subsequent to Jan van Eyck's death (June ), it is likely that the work, left unfinished, had been completed by members of his.I was privileged to see the St Jerome in January at the Leonardo exhibition at the National Gallery in London.

For me, as mentioned above, the picture certainly carries a powerful aura, quite a different feeling to a reproduction in a book, to view first-hand da Vinci’s construction of a work is magical.